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Welcome to the D-day site:

Here you can find the latest news and information and browse the extensive archives of this long running project.

If you have any questions please use the forums or leave a message in the shout box on this page.

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Japanese Building Animations,

Continuing on from the last news post here are several animations of the Japanese buildings.

Construction Yard
Jap_conyard_mk.gif
Note the MCV which was made by converting the vxl to a 3D model with VXLSE, a very useful but underused feature of the program.

Jap_conyard_a.gif
I'm a bit disappointed with this production anim, I originally planed to make the crane pick up the create & turn 270o & place it where the chimneys are, however I realised to late that it wouldn't be possible with this design because of the way the game handles production anims, so I had to simplify it.

Power Plant
Jap_power_a.gif

Factory
Jap_factory_mk.gif

Type 11 Radar
Jap_radar_a.gif
Yes the whole building rotates. Luckily in real life it was stationary most of the time scanning specific areas, otherwise I'd imagine the operators would get nauseous quickly!    

Airfield
Jap_airfield_mk.gif

Tech Centre
Jap_tech_mk.gif

Lastly here are the damaged versions of the buildings.

japbuild_ds.png

Posted June 8, 2015 by

Ke-Ni & Ke-Ho Variants,

Continuing from the Type 95 Ha-Go based vehicles seen in the last news post. This news post shows some of the vehicles designed to replace it as the as the war in the pacific intensified. Because of the destruction of Japan's industrial capabilities it wasn't possible to put any of them into mass production & the Ha-Go was left to fight with ever decreasing effectiveness until the end of the war.

Type 98B Ke-Ni Otsu
Ke_nib.jpg
At the same time Hino Motors were developing the Type 98 Ke-Ni Mitsubishi started work an alternative design using four large road wheels attached to coil springs in a similar layout to the Christie suspension system used by the Russians and British. During testing Hino Motor's Ke-Ni with Bell crank suspension proved to be superior and work on the Ke-Ni Otsu was stopped.

Type 98 Ke-Ni Kai
Ke_ni2.jpg
A proposed upgrade of Type 98 Ke-Ni changing the turret for the one used on the Type 97 Chi-Ha "Shinhoto". This design didn't leave the drawing board and remained only a proposal. This design is often mistaken as an early or alternative version of the Type 5 Ke-Ho but they are separate projects.

Type 2 Ke-To
Ke_to.jpg
The Type 2 Ke-To was an upgrade of the Type 98 Ke-Ni, replacing the turret with a new taller version & changing the main cannon from a Type 100 37mm to the newer Type 1 37mm. Even thought it was originally designed in 1941 production didn't start until 1944, only 29 were eventually built before the end of the war and none where used in combat.

Type 5 Ke-Ho
Ke_ho.jpg
With the failure of the Type 98 Ke-Ni to fully replace the aging Type 95 Ha-Go work started in 1942 on a completely new light tank design to counter the growing allied threat. At the time there was more interest in developing new medium tanks, the navy also had priority for steel so the project was put on hold. By 1945 the Ha-Go was now gravely obsolete and suffering heavy losses, with no available replacement production of the Ke-Ho was finally authorized. With japans industrial infrastructure destroyed and severe shortages of materials it was impossible to start mass production though. It is believed that a single prototype was completed before the end of the war but no photographic evidence has been found.

Type 5 Ku-Se
Ku_se.jpg
The Ku-Se was a proposal to modify the Type 5 Ke-Ho by removing the turret and replacing it with a fixed structure equip with a 75mm Type 99 gun, creating a fast and agile light support vehicle. The war ended before a prototype of the Ke-Ho and in turn the Ku-Se was completed.

Posted April 2, 2015 by

Ha-Go Variants,

Following on from the last news post here are several new Japanese tanks based on the Type 95 Ha-Go.


Type 3 Ke-Ri
Ke_ri.jpg
The Type 3 Ke-Ri was a upgrade of the Type 95 Ha-Go replacing the Type 98 37mm with a Type 97 57mm. During testing the larger 57mm cannon proved difficult to use in the Ke-Ri's small turret so work on the design was canceled.

Note:
There is some confusion about what turret the Type 3 Ke-Ri used, some sources state that it used the standard Type 95 Ha-Go turret and others show something similar to the turret of the Type 98 Ke-Ni. For now I've used the later design for ease of recognition but it might be changed in the future once a more reliable source has been found.

Type 4 Ke-Nu
Ke_nu.jpg
Near the end of the war several programs were launched to upgrade or replace the aging Type 95 Ha-Go in an effort to combat the growing allied armour threat. One of these was the Type 4 Ke-Nu which replaced the standard Ha-Go turret with the turret from the Type 97 Chi-Ha which became surplus after it was upgraded to the Type 97 Shinhoto. One hundred were converted before the end of the war with the majority of them stationed of the home islands, a few were used in Korea & Manchukuo were they fought Soviet troops in 1945, one of them was captured and now resides in Kubinka Tank Museum.

Type 4 Ho-To
Ho_to.jpg
The Type 4 Ho-To was an experimental self propelled gun based on the Type 95 Ha-Go, the turret was removed and replaced with an open structure fitted with a Type 38 120mm Howitzer. A single prototype was built in 1944 and tested but the results of the testing or the prototype's fate after the war is unknown.

Posted March 31, 2015 by

Early Japanese light tanks.,

I haven't posted any new D-day news in three months, during that time I've been slowly working to finish all of the Japanese ground units. I'm nearing the end of this task and currently have over 30 new units to show, I hope to post them all in the coming weeks and to start things off here are some of Japan's first tanks.

To see more information and photos click on the images to go to their Wiki pages.


Ko-Gata Sensha
79ko.jpg
Like many countries Japan's first tank was the Renault FT which they bought 13 of from France in 1919 and named Ko-Gata Sensha, which means tank model A. They were initially given to the cavalry who were very impressed a requested more, however in 1922 the Imperial Japanese Army decided that only the infantry units will be allowed tanks so they were all transferred. In 1929 several of them were sent to Manchuria were they successfully participated in several clashes with Chinese forces. By 1932 they were becoming outdated and gradually replaced with new designs, so all of the remaining vehicles were given to the IJA tank school where they were used for driver training until they were worn out.

Otsu-Gata Sensha
Nc27.jpg
After the success of the Ko-Gata Sensha the Japanese sought to buy more modern designs from France, however the French were unwilling to sell there latest designs to another country, especially when they were all needed to equip their own army. Renault however was working on a new version of the FT17 called the NC1, which the French Army had rejected so they were eager to sell to Japan. After going through trials back in Japan the engine was found to be underpowered so it was replaced with a more powerful Mitsubishi diesel engine, the armour was also upgraded and the weapons changed to indigenous Japanese designs. They served in Manchuria and China along with the Ko-Gata during the 1930's, by 1940 they were still in active service but were soon replaced with new tanks.

Type 92
Typ92.jpgTyp92b.jpg
The Type 92 was Japan's first indigenous tankette, designed in 1931 for recon and infantry support with the cavalry. During that time though tanks were controlled by the infantry, to get round this restriction it was classified as an heavy armored car. exactly the same type of "reclassification" was also used in America with the M1 Combat Car. The Type 92 proved successful in China but tended to throw its tracks in high speed turns, to solve this problem the suspension and wheels were changed in later production models.

Type 97 Te-Ke
Te_ke.jpg
Following the development of the Type 94 TK Hino Motors started work on an improved diesel powered version with a larger weapon. Initial trials of the prototype did not go well so Hino Motors went back to the drawing board and designed a larger version of the Type 94 TK with the diesel engine moved from the front to the rear and the turret moved to the middle. Production of the Type 97 Te-Ke started in 1939 and soon replaced the Type 94 TK on the assembly line.

Type 98 So-Da
So_da.jpg
The Type 98 So-Da was an ammunition & personnel carrier based on the Type 97 Te-Ke, it could carry 10 infantry or 1 ton of cargo.

Type 100 Te-Re
Te_re.jpg
The Type 100 Te-Re was a artillery observation vehicle based on the Type 98 So-Da, the rear compartment that was usually used for storing cargo or troops was instead fitted with a large radio and observation equipment. Using these it would find and relay targets to artillery positions, then observe were the shells hit and give corrections.

Ingame the Te-Re works as a scout that can call in artillery strikes from off map.

Posted March 26, 2015 by

Merry Xmas from D-day,

Christmas is a time for family & friends to join together and celebrate, D-day is no exception so all of the ground units peacefully posed together for a group screenshot. Some unreleased Polish, Chinese & Swedish units also joined in too, can you spot them? The tiny Goliath demo tank is also hiding among its bigger brothers :p

units2_s.png

Posted December 25, 2014 by