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Welcome to the D-day site:

Here you can find the latest news and information and browse the extensive archives of this long running project.

If you have any questions please use the forums or leave a message in the shout box on this page.

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Japanese Anti-Aircraft Guns.,

Following on from the last news post here are the Japanese Anti-Air defences, which range from one of the smallest to the biggest AA gun ever used.

To see more information and photos of these guns click on the images to go to their Wiki pages.

Type 96 25mm
Type96_25mm.jpg
In 1935 the Japanese were looking for a new light naval anti-aircraft weapon to replace their Vickers 40mm guns. A group of officers & engineers traveled to France to inspect the 25mm Hotchkiss design, several were bought back to Japan & tested at Yokosuka Navy Yard as the Type 94/95. Soon after a license was agreed & mass production started in Japan as the Type 96. It became the standard Japanese light anti-aircraft weapon with nearly 33,000 built by the end of the war.

Type 99 88mm
Type99_88mm.jpg
Following the battle of Nanking in December 1937 the Japanese captured several German 88mm SK c/30 anti-Air guns that had been bought by the Chinese Kuomintang army. After examining them they realized that they were superior to their own anti-Air guns so work stared on reverse engineering the design & in 1939 a copy of it was put into production as the Type 99. Because of their superiority most were kept on the Japanese home islands to defend vital areas against the Allied air raids.

Type 5 150mm
Type5_150mm.jpg
The Type 5 15cm is the largest anti-aircraft gun ever deployed in combat. Developed from the earlier Type 3 12cm which was designed specifically to counter the Boeing B-29 Superfortress, however it was soon found that the B-29 could fly even higher then the Type 3's effective range so an even bigger gun was needed. Development proceeded quickly & a prototype was soon ready but with Japan's infrastructure destroyed & limited resources only two were built before the end of the war. The two guns were deployed to Kugayama in the outskirts of Tokyo, in their first engagement on 1 August 1945 they successfully shot down two B-29s. Seeing the threat from these new weapons the USAF avoided flying near Kugayama for the rest of the war, so even though they were only used once they still defended Tokyo as an effective deterrence.

Posted October 18, 2014 by Mig Eater

Japanese Anti-Tank guns,

Today's news post focuses on Japanese Anti-Tank defences, which range from the inadequate, the opportunistic and the mighty.   

To see more information and photos of these guns click on the images to go to their Wiki pages.

Type 1 47mm
Type1_47mm.jpg

Work on Japan's first indigenous anti-tank gun design started in 1937 with several experimental prototypes built, none were put into production though because of inadequate performance. Following the defeat of Japanese forces to the Soviets During the Nomonhan Incident in 1939 interest in a new anti-tank gun resurfaced. Work on the design continued over the next few years and was finally completed in 1941 and standardised as the Type 1 47mm, production started in 1942 and it was deployed into service during 1943. By then the Allies had introduced newer tank designs witch the Type 1 was unable to effectively defeat, however with no other anti-tank guns available it continued to be used until the end of the war.

Available Pre & Early war.

Type 90 75mm
Type90_75mm.jpg

Designed in 1930 the Type 90 75mm was a field gun based on a French Schneider cannon, the design was an effective weapon but expensive and very complex to build and maintain. It was originally designed as a field gun/light artillery but during the later stages of the war the Type 90 was also successfully used as an anti-tank gun, being one of the few weapons that could effectively defeat the newer Allied tanks. In light of this the weapon was modified and used in the Ho-Ni and Chi-Nu tanks.

Available Mid & Late war.

Type 5 105mm
Type5_105mm.jpg

The Type 5 was an experimental anti-tank gun developed in 1945 during the closing stages of WW2, the Japanese had planned to use this weapon in the Type 5 Ho-Ri tank destroyer but the war ended before a prototype of the Ho-Ri was built.

Available Post war.

Posted September 23, 2014 by Mig Eater

Japanese Amphibious Tanks,

You thought I was done with Japanese tanks!? Well think again because there are plenty more to come :p Japan was the only country during the war to operationally use mass produced tanks that were specifically designed to be amphibious. These tanks are now buildable in D-day, allowing Japan strike swiftly on both land and sea.

To see more information, diagrams and photos of these units click on the images to go to their Wiki pages.

SR I-Go
I_go.jpgI_go_w.jpg
The SR I-Go was the Imperial Japanese Army's second Amphibious tank design, the prototype was finished in 1934. It was a large box shaped vehicle separated into several watertight sections, this gave it the ability to stay afloat even if the hull had been penetrated in one or more places. Testing showed it was quite buoyant but it's 70hp engine was only able to propel it to a max speed of 9km/h after a long period of acceleration. The steering in water was also unreliable in anything other then calm waters. Because of these reasons development was stopped an work moved on to a new design.


SR Ro-Go
Ro_go.jpgRo_go_w.jpg
Following the failure of the SR I-Go work quickly moved onto a completely new design. It was a smaller more compact vehicle using a new Horstmann type suspension system, a boat shaped bow was used to increase acceleration and two propellers with rudders were used greatly increasing performance in water. A small amount were built in 1935 and sent to China, one of them was later captured in Manchuria by Soviet troops.

Type 2 Ka-Mi
Ka_mi.jpgKa_mi_w.jpg
The Type 2 Ka-Mi was he Imperial Japanese Navy's first amphibious tank. Based on the Imperial Japanese Army's Type 95 Ha-Go, it was heavily modified with a completely new welded hull with rubber seals making it watertight. Large hollow pontoons were attached to the front and rear to make it buoyant, the pontoons could be quickly detached by the crew from within the tank once it had reached land, sometimes they were kept attached to add an additional layer of armour but this reduced maneuverability. Production of the Ka-Mi started in 1942 after Japans initial amphibious attacks in the pacific. Soon after Japan was forced onto the defensive so the Ka-Mi was never used in it's original role, instead they were mainly used to support isolated garrison on small islands, often being dug into the ground and used as pillboxes.

Type 3 Ka-Chi
Ka_chi.jpgKa_chi_w.jpg
With the success of the Type 2 Ka-Mi the Imperial Japanese Navy started work on designing a larger vehicle with stronger armor and armament. To speed up development many parts from the new Type 1 Chi-He were used. Type 3 Ka-Chi entered service in late 1943 but by 1944 Japan was on the defensive and there were no planes for future amphibious assaults so production of the Ka-Chi was a very low priority, only 19 were built by the end of the war in 1945.

Type 4 Ka-Tsu
Ka_tsu.jpgKa_tsu_w.jpg
Experiences during the beginning of the war showed that landing craft were quite vulnerable to attack and were not suited to resupplying Japanese garrisons on smaller island that were cut off from supply. So in 1943 work started on an armored amphibious cargo tractor that could be transported by submarine to the besieged islands. The prototype was ready by the end of 1943 and was tested until March 1944. Soon after plans were made to use the Ka-Tsu to attack Allied ships anchored in atolls that were protected by the outer reefs. The Ka-Tsu however could simply drive over the reef and then back into the water on the other side to attack the now vulnerable ships. Several vehicles were modified and successfully tested but the war ended before the plan could be carried out.

Type 5 To-Ku
To_ku.jpgTo_ku_w.jpg
A further development of the Type 3 Ka-Chi, the To-Ku used an improved sloped armour layout to increase protection. The 47mm Type 1 cannon was moved from the turret to the hull and replaced with a 25mm Type 95 gun. The front pontoon was lowered so the 47mm cannon & the bow machine gun could be used while it was in water. Some sources state that a single prototype was completed before the war but no photographic evidence has been found.

I'm going to take a break from units for awhile and work on some new terrain and maps next, so look out for that in a week or two.

Posted August 15, 2014 by Mig Eater

American Bulldogs.,

This news post looks at the American Post-War family of vehicles based on the M41 chassis. The M41 Bulldog and M42 Duster have actually been in D-day for sometime, however their voxels were very inaccurate and in desperate need of replacing. As I was redoing them I thought I'd also make several other units based on the M41 too (including some non-American variants that I'll post at a later time :p ).

If you want to see more information and pictures on any of these units click on the images to go to their D-day wiki pages.

M41 Walker Bulldog
M41.jpg
Designed to replace the M24 Chaffee development started in 1947 on the T37, which used a new experimental rangefinder and British fire control system. While advantageous this experimental system was deemed too complex and in need of further development. With the outbreak of the Korean War in 1950 the need for a new tank to replace the M24 Chaffee was even greater as it was struggling to defend against the enemy T-34/85 tanks. So work quickly moved onto the T41E1 which used a new rounder turret and simplified rangefinder, it was rushed into production in 1951 as the M41 Little Bulldog. It was soon renamed the Walker Bulldog after US Army General Walton Walker who died in a traffic accident in 1950 while in Korea.

M41A1 Walker Bulldog
M41a1.jpg
The M41 Walker Bulldog was rushed into production in 1951 to fight in the Korean War, some had even arrived in Korea before official testing had finished and the design standardised. Because of this the design suffered from several flaws, the M41A1 was put into production in 1954 in hopes to fix these issues. The original electrical turret traverse system was deemed to slow and so it was replaced in the M41A1 with a new hydraulic system which not only increased the turret's rate of turn but was also more compact and allowed more rounds to be stored in the turret. Another problem was that debris could get stuck between the tracks and fenders and cause the tracks to be thrown off the wheels and damage the tank. To fix this the side skirts were removed, track defectors were added under the fenders and the fenders were also rounded off on the ends. Over 2,300 M41A1 Walker Bulldog's were built and used until 1969 when it was replaced by the M551 Sheridan. Many were then sold to other countries where they were further upgraded with bigger guns and more powerful engines, some of these tanks are still in service today.

M42 Duster
M42.jpg
The M42 Duster was designed in 1952 to replace the M19. The twin 40mm Bofors guns used on the M19 were still an effective anti-aircraft weapon system though, so the M41 was simply modified to use the turret from the M19. In 1963 the M42 was removed from front line duty and replaced with the medium range HAWK missile system. However in the 1966 the US Army in Vietnam lacked any close anti-air defense and so the M42 was recalled back into service, the North Vietnamese air force however never became a threat. The M42 was instead used to great success as a ground support vehicle, its 40mm guns being able to deal heavy damage to unarmoured targets.

M44
M44.jpg
Built to replace the M41 in 1953, the M44 was based on a reversed M41 chassis with the engine at the front and the fighting compartment at the back. It used the same 155mm howitzer as the M41 but instead of being in the open it was now placed within an armoured crew compartment.

M52
M52.jpg
Development of the M52 started in 1951 along with the M44. Both used the same chassis, which was modified from the M41. Unlike the M44 the M52 used a fully inclosed turret equipped with a nuclear, biological and chemical protection system so it could be used on a contaminated battlefield. Development dragged on for several years an went thorough several prototypes. One of which put the ventilation system next to the engine exhaust, which resulted in dangerous level of carbon monoxide being vented into the turret! By 1955 all the problems were worked out and the the M52 was put into production. Over 680 were built and many were later sold to other countries who still use them today.

Posted June 13, 2014 by Mig Eater

D-day wiki, 12th Anniversary.,

It's June 6th, D-day!

This year marks the 70th anniversary of operation Overlord the Allied landings in Normandy. As I write this there are events happening all around the world to commemorate this world changing battle. Celebrations starting early this morning at Pegasus Bridge where the first allied troops silently landed in gliders and captured the vital bridge in minutes. Later in the morning British paratroopers dropped from the skies, among them was an 89 year old veteran who jumped into battle for the first time 70 years ago. Not to be out done the Royal Marines reenacted the amphibious landings with a flotilla of ships sailing from Portsmouth to Arromanches. With them was also several veterans, one of which celebrates his 100 birthday next month.
       
Of course today is also the 12th year that the D-day mod for Red Alert 2 has been in development and the 2nd year since its public release. Unfortunately unlike the previous years I don't have a new version of D-day ready for release. Instead to commemorate this anniversary I have created a wiki for D-day's vast collection of units.
 

mdb_wiki_s.png


The D-day Wiki currently has over 650 articles with 1,500 images. It's been quite a mammoth task to put it all together over the past few months, however I'm still far from finished. I'll be continuing to update it with background histories on each of the units along with photos and diagrams of the real vehicles. I hope you will enjoy looking though the wiki as much as I have making it.

Posted June 6, 2014 by Mig Eater