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Here you can find the latest news and information and browse the extensive archives of this long running project.

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Ha-Go Variants,

Following on from the last news post here are several new Japanese tanks based on the Type 95 Ha-Go.


Type 3 Ke-Ri
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The Type 3 Ke-Ri was a upgrade of the Type 95 Ha-Go replacing the Type 98 37mm with a Type 97 57mm. During testing the larger 57mm cannon proved difficult to use in the Ke-Ri's small turret so work on the design was canceled.

Note:
There is some confusion about what turret the Type 3 Ke-Ri used, some sources state that it used the standard Type 95 Ha-Go turret and others show something similar to the turret of the Type 98 Ke-Ni. For now I've used the later design for ease of recognition but it might be changed in the future once a more reliable source has been found.

Type 4 Ke-Nu
Ke_nu.jpg
Near the end of the war several programs were launched to upgrade or replace the aging Type 95 Ha-Go in an effort to combat the growing allied armour threat. One of these was the Type 4 Ke-Nu which replaced the standard Ha-Go turret with the turret from the Type 97 Chi-Ha which became surplus after it was upgraded to the Type 97 Shinhoto. One hundred were converted before the end of the war with the majority of them stationed of the home islands, a few were used in Korea & Manchukuo were they fought Soviet troops in 1945, one of them was captured and now resides in Kubinka Tank Museum.

Type 4 Ho-To
Ho_to.jpg
The Type 4 Ho-To was an experimental self propelled gun based on the Type 95 Ha-Go, the turret was removed and replaced with an open structure fitted with a Type 38 120mm Howitzer. A single prototype was built in 1944 and tested but the results of the testing or the prototype's fate after the war is unknown.

Posted March 31, 2015 by Mig Eater

Early Japanese light tanks.,

I haven't posted any new D-day news in three months, during that time I've been slowly working to finish all of the Japanese ground units. I'm nearing the end of this task and currently have over 30 new units to show, I hope to post them all in the coming weeks and to start things off here are some of Japan's first tanks.

To see more information and photos click on the images to go to their Wiki pages.


Ko-Gata Sensha
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Like many countries Japan's first tank was the Renault FT which they bought 13 of from France in 1919 and named Ko-Gata Sensha, which means tank model A. They were initially given to the cavalry who were very impressed a requested more, however in 1922 the Imperial Japanese Army decided that only the infantry units will be allowed tanks so they were all transferred. In 1929 several of them were sent to Manchuria were they successfully participated in several clashes with Chinese forces. By 1932 they were becoming outdated and gradually replaced with new designs, so all of the remaining vehicles were given to the IJA tank school where they were used for driver training until they were worn out.

Otsu-Gata Sensha
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After the success of the Ko-Gata Sensha the Japanese sought to buy more modern designs from France, however the French were unwilling to sell there latest designs to another country, especially when they were all needed to equip their own army. Renault however was working on a new version of the FT17 called the NC1, which the French Army had rejected so they were eager to sell to Japan. After going through trials back in Japan the engine was found to be underpowered so it was replaced with a more powerful Mitsubishi diesel engine, the armour was also upgraded and the weapons changed to indigenous Japanese designs. They served in Manchuria and China along with the Ko-Gata during the 1930's, by 1940 they were still in active service but were soon replaced with new tanks.

Type 92
Typ92.jpgTyp92b.jpg
The Type 92 was Japan's first indigenous tankette, designed in 1931 for recon and infantry support with the cavalry. During that time though tanks were controlled by the infantry, to get round this restriction it was classified as an heavy armored car. exactly the same type of "reclassification" was also used in America with the M1 Combat Car. The Type 92 proved successful in China but tended to throw its tracks in high speed turns, to solve this problem the suspension and wheels were changed in later production models.

Type 97 Te-Ke
Te_ke.jpg
Following the development of the Type 94 TK Hino Motors started work on an improved diesel powered version with a larger weapon. Initial trials of the prototype did not go well so Hino Motors went back to the drawing board and designed a larger version of the Type 94 TK with the diesel engine moved from the front to the rear and the turret moved to the middle. Production of the Type 97 Te-Ke started in 1939 and soon replaced the Type 94 TK on the assembly line.

Type 98 So-Da
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The Type 98 So-Da was an ammunition & personnel carrier based on the Type 97 Te-Ke, it could carry 10 infantry or 1 ton of cargo.

Type 100 Te-Re
Te_re.jpg
The Type 100 Te-Re was a artillery observation vehicle based on the Type 98 So-Da, the rear compartment that was usually used for storing cargo or troops was instead fitted with a large radio and observation equipment. Using these it would find and relay targets to artillery positions, then observe were the shells hit and give corrections.

Ingame the Te-Re works as a scout that can call in artillery strikes from off map.

Posted March 26, 2015 by Mig Eater

Merry Xmas from D-day,

Christmas is a time for family & friends to join together and celebrate, D-day is no exception so all of the ground units peacefully posed together for a group screenshot. Some unreleased Polish, Chinese & Swedish units also joined in too, can you spot them? The tiny Goliath demo tank is also hiding among its bigger brothers :p

units2_s.png

Posted December 25, 2014 by Mig Eater

Japanese Fortifications,
Now that all the Japanese defences are complete they are fortifying their position in preparation to strike out & take their place as one of D-day's main sides.

japdef_s.png
Posted November 14, 2014 by Mig Eater

Japanese Artillery.,
Continuing with the Japanese defences, here are their fixed artillery weapons.

To see more information and photos of these guns click on the images to go to their Wiki pages.

Type 91 105mm
Type91_105mm.jpg
During the 1920 the Japanese Army Technical Bureau bought several French Canon de 105 mle 1913 Schneider howitzers for evaluation purposes, impressed with the design a further 300 were ordered from Schneider. In 1931 a locally produced Japanese version was put into production as the Type 91 and became the standard Japanese Army light howitzer with over a 1,000 produced during the war.

Type 96 150mm
Type96_150mm.jpg
During the mid 1920 the Japanese started work on a new 150mm howitzer to replace the Type 4 15cm (model 1915). Development lasted for over a decade and went through several stages, the design was finally accepted in 1936 but some changes were still needed and mass production didn't start until 1937. The Type 96's protracted development proved to be beneficial as the end result was considered to be one of the most modern and effective howitzers of WW2. One the Type 96's main features was the ability to fire at an elevation of 65°, but this was only possible when a pit was dug beneath the breech.

Type 4 40cm

Type4_40cm.jpg
The development of a heavy spin stabilised rocket mortar was started in 1942 to replace the Type 98 32cm Spigot Mortar. The first prototypes used a large steel launch tube but this proved to be overly complex and a simpler triangular frame with wooden rails was designed. Mass production started in late summer 1943 and by early 1944 several Rocket Battalions had been formed and equipped with this new weapon. The Type 4 was used in combat for the first time during the Battle of Luzon where over a 1,000 were fired, it was also used during the fighting on Iwo Jima and Okinawa. Many launchers and rockets were also stockpiled in Japan for the expected invasion.
Posted November 9, 2014 by Mig Eater